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The Hondas had a wider power band but needed to be kept between 19,000 and 21,000rpm. To get off the line the riders revved it to 18,000rpm and then feathered in the clutch until it got going. Honda tried everything to go faster and even used bicycle type brakes, which clamped onto the wheel rim which reduced the unsprung weight. This worked so well that they tried it on the 125cc but the rim got so hot it melted the tyres. Honda withdrew in 1966 and Suzuki followed when the category was restricted to single cylinders with 6 gears and an amazing era was over.
The golden period for the 50cc bikes was in the sixties when Suzuki and Honda threw the full weight of their technology into developing these pocket rockets. The two stroke Suzuki and the four stroke Honda battled for supremacy. By the time the governing body called an end to the category the top 50s were producing 360bhp per litre, revving to 22,500rpm and using 14 speed gearboxes.
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The SUZUKI RP68 3 Cylinder Engine
The Honda RC116 Twin Engine
Suzuki’s 32.5mm x 30mm twin was the most successful bike of that era and was due to be replaced by a 28 x 26.5mm triple when the madness was brought to a halt when the FIM restricted them to single cylinder motors. The final edition of the Suzuki was the RK67 which had 18 bhp at 17,300rpm and a 14 speed gearbox.  ( The RP68 was never raced)
The bikes weighed in at about 50Kg and ran on 2” tyres. These tiny engines with pistons the size of eggcups and gearboxes like jewellery were not easy to ride and needed a lot of skill and technique to get the best from them. To quote Kiwi, Hugh Anderson, winner of the 50cc titles in ’65 and ’66 “You never had more than 500 revs to play with, so you were constantly monitoring the revs, using the clutch and trying to find another hundred rpm – it was minimal stuff.
A little made a big difference. I enjoyed riding them because you were mentally active in a different way; you had to work very kindly and sensitively with the engine to allow it to do it’s best. I had bloody great water blisters on my elbows because they were tucked in against the cylinder heads and my calves got burned against the expansion chamber shields. I wrote it all down: change down 12 gears for this corner, 10 for that corner and how soon". Riding the 50s was like riding a pedal bike as momentum was everything. You had to not let the revs drop out of the incredibly narrow power band.
Stuart Graham who won the 1967 TT for Suzuki –“The most important thing was carrying speed, because losing any revs would lose you a lot of time. The twin had power between 17,000 and 17,500rpm so you were playing a tune on the gearbox and keeping tucked in behind the screen to the bitter end.”
Some riders even wore boots a size too small to cut drag and all were on a permanent diet and being small was essential. Honda only won the title once as they were not willing to get into two-stroke technology. Once Suzuki brought out the twin the Hondas struggled to even stay in it’s slipstream.
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A History of the Suzuki Racing Motorcycle
50cc models 1960—1968
In the year of 1960, Suzuki who had been making motorcycles for some years, decided to apply their knowledge to the racing track and develop a racing 50cc motorcycle.  This followed Honda's lead and as it was proven that to sell to the World, you needed to advertise success to the World.  As a result Suzuki went Grand Prix racing in Europe. The first bikes were very underpowered and the were bested by the Europeans and Honda.  This situation continued until the defection of Ernst Degner from East Germany and the MZ factory, but that is another story.
The Suzuki team photo on an English newspaper before the 1960 Isle Of Man TT at their UK Headquaters.
Suzuki enter a motorcycle team into Grands Prix racing under the manufacturing name Colleda. This was the 125cc RT60 with riders Toshio Matsumoto, Michio Ichino and Ray Fay.  They did not do well with their riders being placed 15th, 16th, and 18th in Isle of Man TT races.
 
Still, 1961 proved to be an important year for the Suzuki racing team. It was later during this year that  the MZ rider Ernst Degner defected from East Germany. The Suzuki team was in desperate need of help in improving their machines and they negotiated with Degner, assisting him in his defection, to help Suzuki develop their engines.  
Degner was a brilliant engineer as well as a competent rider. During the winter 1961—1962 Degner helped Suzuki to develop a new generation of Suzuki racing machines using the technology that he took with him from Walter Kadden and the MZ factory.
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Suzuki RM62 1962
Engine type: Air-cooled 49.64 cc single cylinder rotary valve 2-stroke. 8 bhp/ 10.500 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 40.0 x 39.5 mm
Carburetor type: M22
Compression ratio: 9:1
Top speed: 145 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 8 speeds
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18
Brake type (front): 2 drums, 1 cam
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
Degner push-starting off the line 1962 TT
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Suzuki RM62 1962 without Fairing
Suzuki RM62 1962 with Fairing
But it was in 1963 during the 50cc race that the real history was made, when  Mitsuo Itoh, the eighth-placed starter, took the checkered flag to become the first Japanese rider to win a race at the Isle of Man TT when he claimed the 50cc Ultra-Lightweight TT on the RM63. He remains the only Japanese rider to have ever won an Isle of Man TT race. Itoh won two Grand Prix races during his career. Mitsuo Itoh stayed with Suzuki for most of his racing career

The 50cc Suzuki RM63 for 1963 was just an update on the previous year’s machine with very little change.
Description
Suzuki RM63 1963
Engine type: Air-cooled 49.64 cc single cylinder rotary valve 2-stroke. 11 bhp/ 13.000 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 40.0 x 39.5 mm
Carburetor type: M24
Compression ratio: 8.8:1
Top speed: 150 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 9 gears
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
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Suzuki RM63 1963
Suzuki RM64 1964
By 1964 in the 50cc class, Anderson and Suzuki were invincible.  The machines were reliable and fast and Anderson swept to his third world title with wins at Daytona, France, Finland and the Isle of Man. He also finished second at Barcelona and third at Spa in Belgium to complete a very successful season. One member of the 50cc Suzuki team during that year was Irishman Tommy Robb riding No.3.

Very little change was seen in the RM64 development as the RM63 was tried and tested.  It remained a single cylinder, rotary valve engine and the cycle parts were the same.
The general design and appearance of the machine was carried through in future bikes.
Suzuki RM64 1964
Engine type: Air-cooled 49.64 cc single cylinder rotary valve
2-stroke. 11 bhp/ 13.000 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 40.0 x 39.5 mm
Carburetor type: M24
Compression ratio: 8.8:1
Top speed: 150 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 9 gears
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
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The Ex-Tommy Robb Suzuki RM64
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Suzuki RK65 1965
Suzuki RK66 1966
Suzuki RK67 1967
Suzuki RP68 1968
Suzuki RP68 1968
Suzuki RP68 1968
Engine type: Liquid-cooled 49.75 cc 
Twin Cylinder dual rotating discs valves
2-stroke. 14.4 bhp/ 16.500 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 2 x 32.5 x 30 mm
Carburetor type: Mikuni 18
Compression ratio: 8.6:1
Top speed: 165 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 12/ 10 speed
Rotating drum type box straight cut gears
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
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Georg Anscheidt was another talented rider that had a Suzuki and knew how to use it. Here's Anscheidt in the West German GP steering his water-cooled 50cc RK66 to a victory in Hockenheim.
Engine type: Liquid-cooled 49.75 cc Twin Cylinder
Dual rotating discs valves 2-stroke. 
16.5bhp/ 17.000 rpm. 
Bore x stroke: 2 x 32.5 x 30 mm 
Carburetor type: Mikuni 20mm
Compression ratio: 8.6:1 
Top speed: 165 kph 
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates 
Transmission: 12 speed
Rotating drum type box straight cut gears
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18 
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam 
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
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Engine type: Liquid-cooled 49.75 cc Twin Cylinder
Dual rotating discs valves 2-stroke.
17.5bhp/ 17.250 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 2 x 32.5 x 30 mm
Carburetor type: Mikuni 22mm
Compression ratio: 8.8:1
Top speed: 176 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 14 speed 
Rotating drum type box straight cut gears
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
Suzuki revised the RK67 and it now came with new aerodynamic features such as a raised engine-mounting position, moved by a whole 3 inches. This allowed for a sleeker fairing covering the 41cm wide engine. Carburettors grew 2mm, and a mechanical waterpump increased the cooling effiency. These improvements resulted in a higher top speed and this awesome machine won every single race in that year!

My thanks to Elsberg Tuning for the use of photos and text in some areas. http://www.elsberg-tuning.dk/suzuki.html#rk66 (cut & paste)

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Hans Georg Anscheidt- Suzuki RK67
The RK67 with rear facing exhaust pipes fitted
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The FIM announced in 1967 that 50cc racing engines would be limited to single cylinder and six transmission speeds. 
That's why Suzuki's 1968 year's 50cc racer RP68 never appeared on any race. It was an incredible machine with three cylinders and 19 horsepower. It was ready for racing already in 1967, just before the Japan Grand Prix in 1967 but Suzuki decided there was no point to race a new machine once and then put it in mothballs.
At the end of 1967 Suzuki turns up with a sensation by presenting a brand new three cylinder, afraid of the possibility that Honda would bring out, as rumours had it, a three cylinder in 1968.

The RP68 was a very interesting machine, it has 2 lying and 1 standing water cooled cylinders, Behind the standing cylinder the waterpump installed driving off the gearbox. The bore and stroke were 28x 25mm. This little engine had rotary disc intakes, and was given a rev range and BHP up to 19 bhp at 20.000 rpm, good for some 200km/h. It had a power band of 500 revs and it needed 16 gears.
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Engine type: Liquid-cooled 49.87 cc 3 Cylinder in V
Triple rotating discs valves 2-stroke.
19.0bhp/ 19.000 rpm.
Bore x stroke: 3 x 28 x 25 mm
Carburetor type: 3 x Mikuni 20mm
Compression ratio: 8.8:1
Top speed: 200 kph
Clutch type: Dry multiple plates
Transmission: 14 speed
Rotating drum type box straight cut gears 
Tyres: 2.00-18 / 2.25-18 
Brake type (front): 1 drum, 2 cam 
Brake type (rear): 1 drum, 1 cam
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Suzuki RP68 1968 Gallery
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Description
Our thanks to youtube.com
Suzuki RK67 50cc 1967 Racer
Suzuki RP68 Three Cylinder 50cc 1968 Racer
I understand that this bike is a replica of the three cylinder and does have a Twin Engine
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