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49cc GARELLI MONZA SPECIAL
Road Impressions of new Models
Article By: Stewart Boroughs for Motor Cycle 1967
Additional Information by J.E.E.P
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WHAT'S it to be? Moped, scooterette or motor cycle? This is the question for those who limit their capacity range to the under-50 cc category. If it's a motorcycle you're after, the Garelli Monza Special has just the right sporty appearance and is fastish for its size. As against a scooterette though, it offers a lower standard of comfort and is much less tractable for traffic riding.
Nevertheless, the scooter’s attractions - and those of a moped - are for a different type of rider. For the get-down-to-it brigade, this little Italian motorcycle provides riding fun.
The engine, despite its little 13.25 : 1 compression ratio, starts fairly easily; not full marks here, because, from cold, half-a-dozen kicks were occasionally necessary. A point to remember is that the downdraught Dell’Orto carburettor floods easily and the petrol must be turned off if the bike is left standing for more than a minute or two.
Once buzzing, the little engine goes very well, and seems virtually unburstable. It doesn't object to full-throttle cruising (although, as would be expected, the speed drops appreciably when hills or a headwind are encountered) and 40 to 45 miles can be packed into the hour.
A highly tuned engine usually suffers in tractability, and that of the test bike was no exception. The Monza Special, then, is not at its best when used for town work.
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The Rear Hub Showing the Snail Adjusters
The engine is well served by the transmission. Clutch operation is smooth and the four-speed, foot-change gear box is particularly sweet. Indeed, no special skill was required to make clean, clutchless changes.
As we have found with previous test Garelli bikes, the Monza Special provides top-drawer handling. Although the tyres are of only 2in section (which means you often feel the bumps), the bike can be cornered zestfully with absolute confidence. The only limitation to angle is grounding of the centre stand.
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My weight is 11 stones and tucking in as best I could, top speed achieved was 48mph, with the mean speed only fractionally below this. Maximum power revs in top gear represent 52 mph. There is no doubt that a smaller, lighter rider would reach this figure. Indeed, I often exceeded it with only slight assistance from wind or gradient.
What level of comfort a rider demands is for him to decide and his stature must come into the reckoning.
A small rider might well find the Monza Special to his liking but, for me, the seat was rather too narrow and the dropped bars placed too much of my weight on my wrists. The footrests would have suited me better if they were positioned slightly farther to the rear.
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Excellent
A good feature is that the maximum speed is achieved in under a quarter-mile. Acceleration tests showed a time of 26.8s and a speed of 46 mph for the standing-quarter. This is excellent from such a tiny engine and is, undoubtedly, one of the bull points of the machine.
Braking was first-class, 31ft to rest from 30 mph, and the brakes were smooth and progressive fuel consumption: 95 mpg at 30 mph: 80 mpg at 40mph.
All in all, then, the Garelli is a well-produced little machine with a strong appeal in its intended market. It is, also, suitable for 50cc-class racing and may be obtained with a special racing tank and seat for little more than £5 extra. (later in its development a full ace kit was available from The factory, happily supplied by AGRATI UK. (editor)).
Garelli Monza 1967
Garelli Monza Special 1967
Garelli MONZA Racing Conversions  
As with most "Moped Marques" the Garelli Monza was used in 50cc road and track racing. On occasions only the engine was used, being housed in a bespoke frame of the builders design.
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Here are some pictures of finished conversions and some of projects in progress. 
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The "FAMOS" stable has been running now for many years and has produced some competitive race bikes and speciality frames. Most of these have been for the 50cc class with Alan Leeson being a protagonist, often at the head of the field. Alan also made frames for other riders to build their own race bikes. This is one such frame that he built using the design of the Woolley-Bone ITOM, which was created in 1968 and built by Spondon Engineering.
This MONZA Special is an ex, Greg Lawton bike. Apart from having it displayed on the Racing 50 Enthusiasts Club stand in the early 2000s, I have no other information. Im hope that when the new owner completes his oily rag restoration he will be able to produce pictures of it in its age maintained look.  
No information on this on, but happy to accept contribution if anyone has some.
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A Completed Restoration
Garelli Monza Special 50cc
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